Embedded Chromium in WinForms

Applies To: WinForms, VB.NET, CefSharp

Getting Chromium to show up inside a .NET WinForms application is relatively easy using CefSharp. CefSharp is an open source project which provides Embedded Chromium for .NET (WPF & WinForms). It’s a great way to get Chrome hosted inside of your .NET application.

You can get a simple browser up and running in 5 minutes – which I’ll show you first. There are some additional steps required to use local resources and to handle console messages and dialog prompts which I’ll also show you.

Embedding a Chromium Browser

There’s an easy example over on the CefSharp project page called the MinimalExample that will get you up and running quickly with a bunch of the basics. I’m going to walk you through some very quick steps to just get an embedded browser working in a WinForm.

Getting CefSharp

First, create a new WinForms project. I’m using VB.NET (but C# works great too, of course) and am targeting .NET 4.5. Once you’ve got a project, you’ll need to add the CefSharp binaries. This is done through NuGet and is really simple.

In Visual Studio choose PROJECT > Manage NuGet Packages… In the Package Manager window switch to Online and search for CefSharp. You’ll select CefSharp.WinForms (My version is 37.0.0 but the package should always have the latest stable release) and choose Install:

CefSharpWinFormsNuGet

This will take just a few seconds while it also adds all of the dependent packages. In the end you’ll have 4 packages (CefSharp.WinForms, CefSharp.Common, cef.redist.x64 and cef.redist.x86).

Initial Build

CefSharp doesn’t support the default AnyCPU build configuration. You’ll need to choose BUILDConfiguration Manager… Then change the Active solution platform to either x64 or x86 (just choose new and it’ll walk you through it). Here’s what my Debug configuration looks like:

ConfigurationManager

Go ahead and build the project to make sure there are no reference errors.

Adding the Browser

Open your form and slap a Panel control on there (I’ve named mine panBrowser and set it’s Dock property to Fill). This isn’t required, but it certainly makes it easier to move around when changing your form later.

Switch to the Form’s code and go to the New sub (Constructor in C#). Here’s the code:

Imports CefSharp.WinForms
Imports CefSharp

Public Class Form1

    Private WithEvents browser As ChromiumWebBrowser

    Public Sub New()
        InitializeComponent()

        Dim settings As New CefSettings()
        CefSharp.Cef.Initialize(settings)

        browser = New ChromiumWebBrowser("http://thechriskent.com") With {
            .Dock = DockStyle.Fill
        }
        panBrowser.Controls.Add(browser)

    End Sub
End Class

Be sure to make the appropriate references above (lines 1-2). In this code, we have a ChromiumWebBrowser object (line 6) that we create with a default address and a dock style of Fill (lines 14-15). We then add that control to the Panel we added above. The only other thing we need to do is to call the Cef.Initialize function (line 12). We’re just passing default settings for now (line 11). Run it and you should see something similar to this:

WinFormsBasicBrowser

Congratulations, you’ve got Chrome in your Form!

Loading From Local Resources

In a previous article, Use Local Files in CefSharp, I showed you how to make the necessary objects to register a CefCustomScheme that would load resources from the local file system. I also posted a similar article, Use Embedded Resources in CefSharp, to demonstrate how to load files directly from your project’s manifest. Those articles will give you more detail about how to do this. If you’re following along in C# just head over to that article and copy the objects. Otherwise, here they are in VB.NET:

LocalSchemeHandler

Add a new Class to your project called LocalSchemeHandler.vb and copy/paste the following:

Imports CefSharp
Imports System.IO
Public Class LocalSchemeHandler
    Implements ISchemeHandler

    Public Function ProcessRequestAsync(request As IRequest, response As ISchemeHandlerResponse, requestCompletedCallback As OnRequestCompletedHandler) As Boolean Implements ISchemeHandler.ProcessRequestAsync
        Dim u As New Uri(request.Url)
        Dim filepath As String = u.Authority & u.AbsolutePath

        If File.Exists(filepath) Then
            Dim bytes As Byte() = File.ReadAllBytes(filepath)
            response.ResponseStream = New MemoryStream(bytes)
            Select Case Path.GetExtension(filepath)
                Case ".html"
                    response.MimeType = "text/html"
                Case ".js"
                    response.MimeType = "text/javascript"
                Case ".png"
                    response.MimeType = "image/png"
                Case ".appcache" OrElse ".manifest"
                    response.MimeType = "text/cache-manifest"
                Case Else
                    response.MimeType = "application/octet-stream"
            End Select
            requestCompletedCallback()
            Return True
        End If
        Return False
    End Function

End Class
LocalSchemeHandlerFactory

Add another new Class to your project called LocalSchemeHandlerFactory.vb and copy/paste the following:

Imports CefSharp
Public Class LocalSchemeHandlerFactory
    Implements ISchemeHandlerFactory

    Public Function Create() As ISchemeHandler Implements ISchemeHandlerFactory.Create
        Return New LocalSchemeHandler
    End Function

    Public Shared ReadOnly Property SchemeName() As String
        Get
            Return "local"
        End Get
    End Property

End Class
Registering the Scheme

To tell the browser to use the LocalSchemeHandler we just need to adjust our settings object before the Cef.Initalize function from our Form constructor above:

        Dim settings As New CefSettings()
        settings.RegisterScheme(New CefCustomScheme() With {
                                .SchemeName = LocalSchemeHandlerFactory.SchemeName,
                                .SchemeHandlerFactory = New LocalSchemeHandlerFactory
                                })
        CefSharp.Cef.Initialize(settings)
Proving it Works

To make sure everything is working we’ll need to have an actual local resource to load. Open your application’s directory (mine is bin/x64/debug) and create a folder called web. Cut and paste the following into a text file and save it as index.html in that web folder:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
    <body>
        <h1>My First Heading</h1>
        <p>My first paragraph.</p>
        <img src="images/truck.png"/>
        <script type="text/javascript">
            console.log("Hello from the console!");
            //alert("Hello from a dialog!");
        </script>
    </body>
</html>

Create an images folder inside the web folder and save this image as truck.png in there:

truck

None of these files need to be added to your project, they just need to be in the directory with your executable. Now if you switch the address from the browser initialization code above to local://web/index.html and run the project you should see something like this:

LocalResource

Mapping the Console

You might have noticed a <script> tag in our index.html above with a call to the console. CefSharp provides us with an easy event, ConsoleMessage, that allows us to grab those messages and do whatever we want with them. In our case we just want to display those messages in a TextBox.

I’ve added a Groupbox below the panBrowser Panel control from earlier and put a TextBox control called txtActivity inside it. I’ve set the txtActivity properties like so: Dock=Fill, Multiline=True and ScrollBars=Both. Now we just need to add the following code to our Form code right after the constructor:

    Private Sub onBrowserConsoleMessage(sender As Object, e As CefSharp.ConsoleMessageEventArgs) Handles browser.ConsoleMessage
        If e.Line > 0 Then
            addActivity(String.Format("CONSOLE: {0} ({1}|{2})", e.Message, e.Source, e.Line))
        Else
            addActivity(String.Format("CONSOLE: {0}", e.Message))
        End If
    End Sub

    Private Sub addActivity(Message As String)
        If txtActivity.InvokeRequired Then
            txtActivity.Invoke(New Action(Of String)(AddressOf addActivity), Message)
        Else
            txtActivity.AppendText(Message & vbCrLf)
        End If
    End Sub

We’ve added a handler for the ConsoleMessage event (lines 25-31). The ConsoleMessageEventArgs object provides us with three useful properties: Message, Source and Line. We always receive the Message and depending on how the call to the console was made we may receive information about the Source. When the Line is greater than 0 we output the Message and the Source/Line information, otherwise it’s just the Message.

We’ve also added a helper sub, addActivity, to take care of handling displaying the output. This allows us to easily change our handling in the future but it also simplifies thread considerations. Our embedded browser is multithreaded and the ConsoleMessage event generally doesn’t fire on the main thread. This is the reason for the InvokeRequired/Invoke code in lines 34-36. The actual display happens in line 37 where we use the AppendText method to ensure our textbox scrolls appropriately. Run the project and should see something similar to this:

ConsoleActivity

Handling Dialogs

What about dialog messages? If you uncomment the alert command from the index.html above and run the application you’ll see that in WinForms this gets automatically handled with a MsgBox:

dialogMsgBox

In our application we’d like to redirect these to our Activity feed as well. In CefSharp, you override the default handling of dialogs (alerts, confirmations and prompts) by implementing an IJsDialogHandler object.

In our case we just want everything noted in the activity feed and ignored. To do this, add a class to your project called LogDialogHandler.vb and copy/paste the following code into it:

Imports CefSharp
Public Class LogDialogHandler
    Implements IJsDialogHandler

    Private logReceiver As Action(Of String)

    Public Sub New(LogReceiverAction As Action(Of String))
        logReceiver = LogReceiverAction
    End Sub

    Public Function OnJSAlert(browser As IWebBrowser, url As String, message As String) As Boolean Implements IJsDialogHandler.OnJSAlert
        logReceiver(String.Format("ALERT: {0}", message))
        Return True
    End Function

    Public Function OnJSConfirm(browser As IWebBrowser, url As String, message As String, ByRef retval As Boolean) As Boolean Implements IJsDialogHandler.OnJSConfirm
        logReceiver(String.Format("CONFIRM: {0}", message))
        retval = True
        Return True
    End Function

    Public Function OnJSPrompt(browser As IWebBrowser, url As String, message As String, defaultValue As String, ByRef retval As Boolean, ByRef result As String) As Boolean Implements IJsDialogHandler.OnJSPrompt
        logReceiver(String.Format("PROMPT: {0} ({1})", message, defaultValue))
        result = defaultValue
        retval = True
        Return True
    End Function
End Class

The IJsDialogHandler interface requires us to implement the OnJSAlert, OnJSConfirm and OnJSPrompt functions. We’ve also added a construtor that takes an Action(Of String) which we will use to handle our logging. We store this Action into our private logReceiver object (line 8) so that we can use it later. Then in our implementation of the functions we just call logReceiver with an informative message regarding what’s occurred. In each case we return True to indicate that the alert, etc. has been handled.

To use our new object we just add the following line to the end of our Form constructor:

browser.JsDialogHandler = New LogDialogHandler(New Action(Of String)(AddressOf addActivity))

This allows us to direct any message from our LogDialogHandler to our txtActivity box just like our console messages. Now when we run the application we should see something like this:
AlertActivity

DevTools

Anyone that’s used Chrome for web development is very familiar with the F-12 DevTools and knows they can be invaluable in tracking down issues. Wouldn’t it be nice to have those when working within your .NET application? With CefSharp, it’s super easy. I’ve added a simple button underneath my Activity GroupBox called btnDevTools. Here’s the Click EventHandler:

    Private Sub btnDevTools_Click(sender As Object, e As EventArgs) Handles btnDevTools.Click
        browser.ShowDevTools()
    End Sub

That’s it! Now when you push the button you get the full power of the Chrome DevTools all while running in your form:

DevTools

Conclusion

Obviously, there is a lot you can do with this and there are many features we haven’t even begun to demonstrate, but this should get you started. For me the goal has been to get a Construct 2 game running in a .NET application. In my next post I’ll show you exactly that.

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13 thoughts on “Embedded Chromium in WinForms

  1. Thank you for this tutorial, I found it to be extremely helpful.
    Would you be able to go over how to handle keyboard input, and how pass that input to the form?
    I know I can implement IKeyboardHandler, but I have no idea what that looks like.

    • I haven’t had a need to implement IKeyboardHandler yet. I’ve had no trouble getting keystrokes and mouse input sent directly to the ChromiumWebBrowser. As long as it is the focus, everything just gets passed through. Please let me know if this isn’t working for you. Thanks for your feedback!

    • Do you have both of the Imports (Using in C#) statements in the same code file where you are attempting to use CefSettings?

      Imports CefSharp.WinForms
      Imports CefSharp

  2. This look what I have looking for but I’am getting some errors listed below:
    In the Class LocalSchemeHandler:
    1 “Type Implements ISchemeHandler is not defined”
    2 “Type ISchemeHandlerResponsee is not Defined”
    3 “Type OnRequestCompletedHandler is not Defined
    4 “(parameter) requestCompletedCallback() as OnRequestCompletedHandler ” “Expression is not a method”

    I have added Imports CefSharp to the Class
    Also added CefSharp.dll to project

    Any help would be appreciated.

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