Extending the List of Sites You can Embed From in SharePoint Using PowerShell

The Embed web part for modern pages lets you display content from secure websites right on your page. Want to show a YouTube video? Grab the embed code from youtube.com and slap it in the Embed web part. Wowee!

By default, modern pages support 30+ sites including the most common like YouTube, Vimeo, TED, and internal domains like Stream and OneDrive. But what about when you’ve got content from a site not on this list? You’ll end up with an error similar to this:

Don’t cry! Wipe those tears off that wet face! If you just need to allow the domain for a single site, the instructions are right there (here’s a quick summary):

  • Go to Site Settings
  • Click on HTML Field Security under Site Collection Administration
  • Type the domain from the error message (no https://) into the box and click Add
  • Click OK
  • Give it another try

But wait… Corporate just rolled out a video hosting platform for the enterprise and they want all sites to be able to embed content from this new site. Does the thought of repeating the above steps hundreds or even thousands of times make you weep in despair? Smack those tears off your moistened face!

Here’s a quick snippet of PowerShell which will show you how to add it to multiple sites:

In the PowerShell above, I’m using PnP PowerShell. You can technically do this without PnP PowerShell since it’s just CSOM, but… why would you make your life harder?

Here’s what’s happening:

  • The list of sites in line 1 is just an array of the URL portion of the site after /sites/. You could easily alter this to grab all associated sites for a hub or to get all sites within a classification, etc. But I find a simple list of URLs works pretty well.
  • We connect to the site in line 9 and grab the site object in line 11
  • We get the Client Context in line 12
  • We create a new ScriptSafeDomainEntityData object and set the only part we care about, DomainName, to the URL from the error message before
  • Then in line 17 we use the Create method to add it to the list of domains (there’s no problem if the site already has that domain, it won’t be added twice)
  • We execute the query for the client context to save our changes in line 19
  • Finally we disconnect from the site in line 21 and move on to the next site

You can easily adapt the script above as part of your provisioning process to ensure that new site have the correct domains whitelisted as well. So fun!

Now you can take content from all over the web and mash it together to bring all the relevant stuff directly to your users. WOWEE!

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A Verbose Schema for SharePoint Column Formatting (Proposal)

Declarative customization through Column Formatting in SharePoint Online is a really cool new way to customize how fields in lists and libraries are displayed. It’s all done through JSON and it’s pretty awesome.

I think there are a few minor areas it’s currently falling short, however. Such as:

Unfortunately, although there is an open source repo of great samples, Column Formatting itself is not something we can directly contribute to (outside of issues and user voice like the above). But, I had another issue that I really wanted solved so I solved it (at least for me) and thought I’d share and suggest it (or some version of it) should be adopted officially.

While a UI for generating the JSON would be awesome, the alternative suggestion of writing your column formatter in VS Code using the schema.json is a good one. However, I really wanted better intellisense to help me track down what I can and can’t do. So, I added a bunch of stuff to the schema.json file to do exactly that.

A Verbose Schema

Using my version of the columnFormattingSchema.json (currently available as a gist), you get fancy stuff like this:

VerboseColumnFormatting

Here’s what’s in here compared to the original:

  • Valid operations toLocalString(), toLocaleDateString(), and toLocaleTimeString() are no longer marked as invalid (added them to the operator enum)
  • The style property now only allows values corresponding to supported style attributes
    • Additionally, each style property has enum values corresponding to possible values
  • Valid attributes iconName, rel, and title are no longer marked as invalid
  • class attribute provides enum values (using the predefined classes)
  • target attribute provides enum values
  • role attribute provides enum values
  • rel attribute provides enum values
  • iconName attribute provides enum values
  • Most properties (like txtContent and operators) provide special string enums (@currentField, @me, @now, etc.)

It’s important to note that every value can still be an expression and even where enums are provided for convenience (like class or txtContent), you can still supply a string not in the list.

Using the Schema

When you apply column formatting the JSON is validated, but the actual schema isn’t really restricted like you might expect (this is why you could previously specify an iconName property without issue even though it was technically invalid). This also means that using the Verbose schema won’t cause any problems for you (I’ve actually tested it against every sample available to me) and is actually much more likely to prevent you from getting multiple console error messages about unsupported style attributes, etc.

For now, you can just save the file to your machine and use a local reference (as shown in the image above) or, even better, you can reference it directly from the gist (raw) like this:

{
    "$schema": "https://gist.githubusercontent.com/thechriskent/2e09be14a4b491cfae256220cfca6310/raw/eb9f675bf523208eb840c462d4f716fa92ce14c2/columnFormattingSchema.json"
}

Now, as long as you save that file with a .json extension, VS Code will automatically add the intellisense and extra validation!

You don’t even need to remove the $schema property (you can even leave it out, it is not currently used by SharePoint at all).

Also, for anyone that is wondering what the column formatter shown in the animation above looks like, here it is for a Person field:

Final
My name is red since I’m the logged in user