A Verbose Schema for SharePoint Column Formatting (Proposal)

Declarative customization through Column Formatting in SharePoint Online is a really cool new way to customize how fields in lists and libraries are displayed. It’s all done through JSON and it’s pretty awesome.

I think there are a few minor areas it’s currently falling short, however. Such as:

Unfortunately, although there is an open source repo of great samples, Column Formatting itself is not something we can directly contribute to (outside of issues and user voice like the above). But, I had another issue that I really wanted solved so I solved it (at least for me) and thought I’d share and suggest it (or some version of it) should be adopted officially.

While a UI for generating the JSON would be awesome, the alternative suggestion of writing your column formatter in VS Code using the schema.json is a good one. However, I really wanted better intellisense to help me track down what I can and can’t do. So, I added a bunch of stuff to the schema.json file to do exactly that.

A Verbose Schema

Using my version of the columnFormattingSchema.json (currently available as a gist), you get fancy stuff like this:

VerboseColumnFormatting

Here’s what’s in here compared to the original:

  • Valid operations toLocalString(), toLocaleDateString(), and toLocaleTimeString() are no longer marked as invalid (added them to the operator enum)
  • The style property now only allows values corresponding to supported style attributes
    • Additionally, each style property has enum values corresponding to possible values
  • Valid attributes iconName, rel, and title are no longer marked as invalid
  • class attribute provides enum values (using the predefined classes)
  • target attribute provides enum values
  • role attribute provides enum values
  • rel attribute provides enum values
  • iconName attribute provides enum values
  • Most properties (like txtContent and operators) provide special string enums (@currentField, @me, @now, etc.)

It’s important to note that every value can still be an expression and even where enums are provided for convenience (like class or txtContent), you can still supply a string not in the list.

Using the Schema

When you apply column formatting the JSON is validated, but the actual schema isn’t really restricted like you might expect (this is why you could previously specify an iconName property without issue even though it was technically invalid). This also means that using the Verbose schema won’t cause any problems for you (I’ve actually tested it against every sample available to me) and is actually much more likely to prevent you from getting multiple console error messages about unsupported style attributes, etc.

For now, you can just save the file to your machine and use a local reference (as shown in the image above) or, even better, you can reference it directly from the gist (raw) like this:

{
    "$schema": "https://gist.githubusercontent.com/thechriskent/2e09be14a4b491cfae256220cfca6310/raw/eb9f675bf523208eb840c462d4f716fa92ce14c2/columnFormattingSchema.json"
}

Now, as long as you save that file with a .json extension, VS Code will automatically add the intellisense and extra validation!

You don’t even need to remove the $schema property (you can even leave it out, it is not currently used by SharePoint at all).

Also, for anyone that is wondering what the column formatter shown in the animation above looks like, here it is for a Person field:

Final
My name is red since I’m the logged in user

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